Lost and found in translation

One of the most valuable things of research trips is that it makes me reflect on my earlier work. And it makes that have I to sharpen and polish the narrative about the key findings of that work.   In my previous blog post I have shared the presentation that I gave at the International... Continue Reading →

Making cities better: voluntary programs aren’t enough

Originally posted on: https://theconversation.com/making-cities-better-voluntary-programs-arent-enough-35535 Voluntary programs are all the rage. From ratcheting up cybersecurity to fighting obesity, firms in the United States and elsewhere voluntarily make pledges to do better than governmental regulation. Firms are rewarded for doing so. Governments may stall the introduction of mandatory regulation, clients may be more inclined to buy their goods, and investors... Continue Reading →

Urban sustainability: Australian cities are leading the world … for now

Originally posted on: https://independentaustralia.net/environment/environment-display/australian-cities-please-keep-leading-the-world-in-governance-for-urban-sustainability-and-resilience,7199   Cities hold a significant potential to make a rapid change toward reduced resource consumption and waste production, greenhouse gasses included. Yet, an ongoing reliance on traditional building codes will however not result in the change needed. Innovative governance tools hold more potential. My new book highlights that Australian cities may lead the... Continue Reading →

Governments are too conservative in using innovative governance tools

In comparing how governments exactly participate in innovative governance tools for urban sustainability and resilience I realised that their involvement is very conservative. This, I argue, leaves opportunities of such innovative governance tools unexplored. I discuss this insight in a recent paper (currently under review). The paper seeks to better understand why and how governments... Continue Reading →

  Making cities truly resilient to extreme events is being held back by archaic planning. The majority of buildings don’t fall under new sustainability and resilience regulations, meaning private initiatives have to pick up the slack. It might sound trivial, but more resilient buildings could have prevented losses during events such as Queensland’s devastating 2011 floods, or Hurricane... Continue Reading →

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